2018 News

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Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Art Works Series

A series on Sask Arts Organizations

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Read SAA's new series Art Works, which promotes our members. Each article highlight an arts organization making a positive impact on its community.


 

Sakewewak Art GallerySâkêwêwak Artists’ Collective written by Carle Steel

Through events, mentorship, professional development and service to the community, Sâkêwêwak Artists Collective helps Indigenous artists and their work take their rightful place on the Canadian stage.

New Dance Horizons' Pelican Project written by Ken Wilson

New Dance Horizons’ Pelican Project will be travelling to Vancouver to create a procession with the theme of the great blue heron. 

Estevan Art Gallery & Museum written by Carle Steel

The Estevan Art Gallery and Museum is an essential infrastructure for an isolated city, an oasis for artists and the public hungry for professional art that reflects Canada and all its complexity.

Saskatchewan Filmpool Cooperative’s Film Camp written by Ken Wilson

The camp attracts a diverse population of participants, including Indigenous youth and recent immigrants, and that leads to a diversity of work created at Film Camp.

Chapel Gallery - written by Ken Wilson

The Chapel Gallery is a public gallery which provides public access to and ownership of the art heritage of North Battleford, its region and province.

Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra written by Dave Margoshes

The SSO has embarked on some exciting ventures recently, including overtures to both indigenous and immigrant communities. Students from Thunderchild First Nation – traditional drummers and singers – performed on stage with an SSO ensemble at a Master Series concert. 

Art Gallery of Swift Current written by Carle Steel

Beyond enhancing quality of life, and bringing economic benefits to the region, the Art Gallery of Swift Current helps local people learn to celebrate their way of life.

Rosthern Station Arts Centre written by Dave Margoshes

Rosethern centreIn operation for more than twenty-five years, the centre delivers plays in the summer (thirty-five shows in the 160-seat theatre) plus music, arts exhibits and various other cultural programs year-round